Friday, December 30, 2011

Knit Felt Slippers for Adults


 For a variation on these slippers that does not require cutting the opening, click HERE.

Despite a warmer winter than usual in North Dakota, my feet are cold ~ and the cute store-bought slippers that have sufficed in other years were making my feet sweat. Etsy is full of enticing wool slippers, but they are unfortunately much out of my price range. Not a problem, I can make my own. But the patterns I found for knitted ones do not look like what I had in mind. I wanted warmth for my toes ~ but NOT the ankles. There are a lot of patterns available, but nothing seemed quite what I wanted, so I have developed my own. I like the slippers so well, I made some for my parents, too.


For my mom's slippers, I used 2 strands Lions Brand Fisherman's Wool, Oak Tweed. The flower is made with Nature's Brown in the center and Oatmeal for the petals. Blanket stitching in Nature's Brown.



For my dad's slippers, I used 2 strands Lion Brand Fisherman's Wool, Nature's Brown (One 8 oz skein will be enough for one pair, taking the yarn from both ends of the skein.) One strand of the same color for blanket stitching on the cut edges.

My slippers (top picture) were made with Lion Brand Fisherman's Wool, one strand of Nature's Brown and one strand of Oak Tweed held together.

Instructions:

2 3.5 oz balls worsted weight wool
Double points and/or 24" circular needle, size 11 Double points recommended for toe. If used on the whole slipper, they should be at minimum 8" long.
Using two strands at once, CO 42 stitches. (for woman's narrow CO 40) [for men's medium or large CO 45] Join, being careful not to twist stitches.
Knit one round. [for men, k 3 rounds]
Knit 24 stitches (22) [26]. Work back and forth on these 24 stitches to create the back of the heel. Work 15 rows stockinette st. (Knit one row, purl one row.) End with a purl row.
Turn Heel:
Slip 1, K13 (11) [15] K2 tog, k1, turn
Slip 1, P5 (5) [7], P2 tog, P1, turn
Slip 1, K6 (6) [8], k2 tog, K1, turn
Slip 1, P7 (7) [9], p2 tog, P1, turn
Continue in this manner until all stitches are used up. End with a purl row. (For narrow sizes, the last decrease row will be a knit row. P1 row before beginning gusset.) There should be 14 (13) [16] stitches on needle.
Make Gusset:
Knit 7 (6) [8]. Place marker, if using circular needles. Switch needles if using double points. K7 (For narrow size, K2 tog, then knit 5). Pick up 10 (10) [11] stitches along side of heel flap. Place marker, or switch needles. Knit across 18 (18) [19] stitches, placing them on one needle, if using double points. Place marker, or switch needles. Pick up 10 (10) [11] stitches along other side of heel flap. Knit 7 (6) [8] stitches.


You are now at the center of the heel. This will be the beginning of your rounds. You should have 17 (16) [19] stitches on each side of heel.
Round 1: Knit to within 2 stitches of marker {or the end of the first needle.} K2 tog. Knit the 18 (18) [19] stitches that form the top of the foot. After next marker, {or at the beginning of the 3rd needle} K2 tog.
Round 2:Knit.
Repeat these 2 rounds 4 (4) [5] more times until there are 12 (11) [13] stitches on each side of heel.


Knit around and around to the desired measurement from the beginning of the gusset {where you picked up stitches.}:
For woman's small: 7" 
For woman's medium: 9"
For woman's large or men's medium: 11"
For man's large: 12"


Decrease for toe. Double points will work best here. If you are using a circular needle, you will have to pull up the cable as you go. In other words, pull out a loop of cable without any stitches on it, so you can reach the stitches on the needle to knit them. {It is a hassle, but it is only after years of knitting that I acquired double points in the larger sizes. If you only do an occasional project of this type, the circular needle will work.}


For women's regular size:
Round 1: *K 5, K2 tog* repeat around.
Round 2 and all even rounds: Knit
Round 3: *K4, K2 tog* repeat around
Round 5: *K3, K2 tog*, repeat around
Round 7: *k2, K2 tog*, repeat around
Round 9: *K1, K2 tog*, repeat around


For women's narrow:
Round 1: K3, K2 tog, *K 5, K2 tog* repeat between * to end of round.
Round 2 and all even rounds: Knit
Round 3: K2, K2tog, *K4, K2 tog* repeat between * to end of round
Round 5: K1, K2tog, *K3, K2 tog* repeat between * to end of round
Round 7: K2tog, *K2, K2 tog* repeat between * to end of round
Round 9: K2 K2tog *K1 K2tog*, repeat between * to end of round


For men's or wide slippers:
Round 1: *K 5, K2 tog* repeat between * around until 3 stitches are left. K1, K2 tog.
Round 2 and all even rounds: Knit
Round 3: *K4, K2 tog* repeat around until 2 stitches are left. K2 tog
Round 5: *K3, K2 tog*, repeat around K last stitch
Round 6: *K2, K2 tog*, repeat around, K last stitch
Round 7: *K1, K2 tog*, repeat around, K last stitch


Cut yarn with long tail. Thread on tapestry needle, and sew through stitches on needle. Pull tightly into a circle and sew up. Weave yarn ends into work.


Make flower to put on woman's slippers. Use one of these patterns, if desired:
Five Petal Flower
Easy Flower


Felting Instructions:
Place items to be felted in a pillow case. Tie shut. I use a rubber band or hair tie. This keeps the wool fuzzies from getting in your washing machine. Set machine to smallest wash setting, hot water, and most vigorous speed. Put pillow case with wool items in the machine along with a heavy piece of cloth to increase the agitation. I use an old drapery panel. Allow to agitate 15 - 40 minutes. The time needed will vary according to your wash machine, the water temperature, and the yarn used. I use two wash cycles, or about 24 minutes.  Do not spin out. Spinning may cause creases in the fabric that can not be gotten out. I leave the machine open, so the spinner will not activate, and cover the machine with a heavy cloth. Pull pillow case out of water. Squeeze out excess water and rinse in cold water. Remove slippers. If they need more shrinking, return them to the pillow case and put them back in the washer. If not, squeeze out the water, stuff with towels and allow to dry. They can be stretched a little, if needed.
(Be sure to pull the fuzzies out of your pillow case before throwing it back in the washer to spin out)


Finishing:
For man's slipper, while still wet, cut a slit down the top of the slipper (approximately 4") and fold the corners down.
Trim the foot opening on woman's slipper at least enough so that a foot can easily slide in. You can make it larger if you want. This can be done when the slipper is dry. Attach flower.
Blanket stitching is optional, but it gives a more finished look.

91 comments:

  1. I like the slippers! I just got a pair of the store bought kind though!

    :-) Lyd

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  2. Love the slippers! You did a great job on inventing your own pattern. I like the look of a clog-like slipper. They sure would keep toes toasty in that icky ND winter weather. We're balmy 50's this week. Lovin' it! The brave men hiked Tiger Mountain today, but I'm having to wash the mud out of the tennis shoes and jeans.

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  3. Just found these via Ravelry - they're brilliant! I've copied the pattern straight away ready to make as soon as I've finished the current project. Many thanks for the pattern!

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  4. I also have a question; how did you get the perfect shape of the clog-type slippers??

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  5. I put my foot in them almost as soon as I got them out of the washer! The other two were harder to shape since the recipients are not on hand.

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  6. I honestly don't know if that's what made the difference. The basic pattern (not narrow and not men's) has the more uniform toe shaping.

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  7. Thank you! Can't wait to cast on.
    Fellow knitter from the frozen north.

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  8. Love your slippers! Copying pattern & plan to make soon. Have a heathered looking wool, that has been waiting for a project. My feet thank you!

    Thanks for passing the link on to me, re; the felted basket thingy.... I've sent for it, as it is really close! Appreciate you thinking of me!

    sue
    stitchknit.etsy.com

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  9. I have cold feet, literally and figuratively. I'm a beginner knitter,should I give it a go? I've been looking for a felted
    slipper pattern just like this.

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    1. These are really very easy. Do give it a go. The only tricky thing will be using the double points, but with a little attention you will soon be used to them.
      One of the nice things about felting is that it will hide any imperfections in the knitting.

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  10. What a great pattern! I'm wondering... I have very large feet (women's 11). Would you recommend going with a man's large size? Can't wait to make these! I live in the pacific northwest and wear slippers on my feet nearly year-round. I absolutely LOVE the look of the clogs. As an added bonus, I've never felted before, so this would be a fun project to try out. I'd have to figure out how to do it in a front-loading washing machine, but I think it would be fine. Thanks so much for sharing!

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    1. Can you tell me how you got on doing the felting using a front-loading washing machine? I also have a front-loader. If it doesn't work I was thinking about boiling them in a pot.

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  11. Hi - I have been looking for a pattern for felted slippers and want to make men's size 12 for a b.day present. Love your pattern and love that you have instructions for multiple sizes. So I'm going to go for it.

    I live in the Pacific NW now but grew up in N.Dak. Still have lots of relatives there around Bismarck and visit often.

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  12. I'm amazed these came out so well for me. They are a perfect fit. I thought it would depend on the type of yarn.

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  13. I've just made a pair using another pattern and am quite dissapointed. With all the positive comments I'm going to give yours a go. Let you know how they turn out. Thanks for giving out the pattern too.

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  14. Dear Nita,

    Thanks for sharing this lovely slipper pattern with us. I tried knitting a pair for myself but soon realized the pattern was much to advanced. I really like the slippers you made for you Mom. Nita, do you have in your store some ready made slippers like those posted on this blog?
    Thanks!

    Col

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    1. Col, I don't have any ready made slippers. I could make some for you at $65 + shipping. But you may be able to overcome your difficulties and make them yourself. Feel free to ask for help.

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  15. Just made a pair of these for my mom for her birthday. I know summer is coming but her feet are always cold! These knit like a dream! I was really surprised because the fanciest thing I have ever knit was a scarf in a lace pattern. I thought these would be harder but they weren't! Thanks for the excellent instructions and for posting!

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  16. Love the slippers! You are so talented. Thank you so much for sharing.

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  17. I am in the process of making these slippers right now am very confused about transitioning from the turn of the heel to the gusset. Was i supposed to knit all the the 45 stitches that i casted on when I knitted the "turn of the heel"? Thanks!

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    1. I got stuck following the directions as this point too. Any tips?

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  18. is this pattern for a woman's size 8?

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    1. Yes, approximately size 8, but larger sizes can be achieved by felting less.

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  19. thank you so much!

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  20. sorry, another question, where you say to knit around until 11" for womens's medium, would this length be for size 8? i promise i'll post pics when i'm done.

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    1. For woman's medium, knit 9". This is what I did for me, a size 7 1/2 - 8.

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    2. Remember this 9" measurement is from the gusset, so your slipper is much longer than that.

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  21. I completed them! Thank you so much for sharing your pattern. I'm sure I'm make them again. I used lion brand fisherman's wool. thanks again.

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  22. I haven't checked this out yet, but one knitter says: There is a typo in the gusset. When you are finished with the knitting 16 rows and go around to knit 7 st then pick up 11 along the side of the heel, you actually knit 8 stitches.

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  23. Thank you for the pattern. I live in Canberra in Australia and we have very frosty winter mornings here, these will be perfect toe warmers!

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  24. When knitting the turn of the heel I am stuck as to what instructions mean by "continue knitting in this manner". I understand I want to decrease till I have 14 stitches left total. Can you clarify the other rows for me. It's my first time trying this. Thanks!

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  25. How many stitches per inch for the woman's. I want to use my handspun so have the circumference would help. I assume it's US size needles.

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  26. Exactly what Michelle said on the 16th October. I can't see how to 'continue in this manner'. Any chance you could tell me what other rows I'd need to do - I am using the standard number of stitches. Thank you!

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  27. If you are making the regular size, you started with 24 stitches on your needle. You are decreasing one stitch in each row when you either K2tog or P2tog, and you will end with 14 stitches. If you have completed the 4 rows described above, you should now have 20 stitches on your needle. Continue this way:

    Row 5: Slip 1, K8, K2tog, K1, turn (19 stitches)
    Row 6: Slip 1, P9, P2tog, P1, turn (18 stitches)
    Row 7: Slip 1, K10, K2tog, K1, turn (17 stitches)
    Row 8: Slip 1, P11, P2tog, P1, turn (16 stitches)
    Row 9: Slip 1, K12, K2tog, turn (15 stitches)
    Row 10: Slip 1, P12, P2tog (14 stitches)

    Now go to the next step, which is making the gusset. Feel free to ask if you need more help.

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  28. Thats brilliant - thank you so much for your response :D

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  29. want to make the slippers but do not have washing machine available..... use community machine in RV park..... can I wash them in the kitchen sink and use boiling water ... what do you suggest. need to make them for christmas for a grand daughter who requested them mary

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    1. Yes. You can also boil them in a pot. I have never done this, so I can't tell you how, but I am quite sure it will work.

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    2. I was able to see that an answer to this problem had not been offered. So as I was able to enjoy a day being taught to felt without a washing machine at my millinery course this is the process without a washing machine. Supplies required are plastic or similar gloves for insulation from hot or near-boiling water very bubbley soap, dish detergent for example, and shade cloth to separate layers such as the inside of the slipper here surfaces may felt together, and bubble wrap for agitating material to be felted. A paper pattern for your required size for the felt process.
      On a flat surface lay down a material for waterproofing your table. Secure to surface of table Next lay down one half of your bubblewrap with the bubbles on top and larger than your item to be felted. Place shade cloth in between items two folded surfaces. Place item on this bubble wrap layer. Put on your gloves now. Apply hot water to item to just wet it. Then gently squeeze some soap fairly evenly onto the top of the item. Put your hand into this very hot water to turn over your item. Add more detergent on this side. Place other half of wrap on top. Rub wrap and item hard and vigorously, if water cools add more hot water. A paper pattern for your required size can be used to indicate when you have felted to size.
      Now take out the item and throw or bash it onto the table, this stabilizes the felting. Place item into a cool water bath, if a hat or slipper place onto a form, hat block or foot and leave to dry.
      If the felting process stops and hot water and friction will not create further shrinkage when compare to your starting size and your required size shock the partly felted item with a very cold bath and start the felting from the beginning and more shrinkage shout occur.
      This process must be used with unprocessed wool or natural fibres, on much larger needles to allow for the felt felting process to be successful.
      My knitting experience has taken 40+ years and Nita your pattern is a treasure of the first order, I will be making it as soon as I get my new Knooks. I adopted circular as soon as I could in the1960s, so now I am challenged to try the Knook for the smaller circular items when I feel more comfortable using more than four circular needles. During this knitting circular items I knit each needle with the OTHER end of the same circular needle, this is much more successful than using another needle as would be the process with the dpn's. If the 4 circular needles are not enough I use 5. Using this method I completed 6 beanies for my grandson without any seams, stitches were even numbers. My mention of this off-topic subject is to help the circular working process used in your pattern and a stitch marker showing the joined ends helps as well.
      I do hope this comment provides assistance to help everybody in their endeavours.

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  30. I'm working on some right now. I am so excited to have some warm slippers. Thanks for the pattern!

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  31. I have a question and was hoping you might be able to help. I want to make these slippers for my dad, but like the ones you made for yourself. I knit incredibly tight and usually have to go up a needle size or two. My question is should I cast on more stitches? And how long should I make the foot for a size 10.5? I'm sorry for all the questions. I've never felted or made anything like this before and I love the pattern! They're perfect! Thanks!

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  32. Hello. Thank u for your pattern. I need help.
    After casting on 45 stitches for men's size and knitting 3 rows, I put 19 stitches on a holder while I worked the 26 stitches back and forth for the back of the heel. I turned the heel and made the gusset. I m at the point where I knit around and around with 13 stitches per needle on 2 needles for the length. What do I do or what should I have done w the 19 stitches on holder? Hanks so much for your help.
    Joan

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    1. Joan, Those 19 stitches should have been knit when you were making the gusset. When done turning the heel you would have been left with 16 stitches. You separate these so you have 8 on each of two needles. With one of the needles with 8 stitches on it you pick up 11 stitches along the side of your heel flap (making 19 stitches). With a fresh needle, knit the 19 stitches that you had on a holder. Then pick up another 11 stitches on the other side of the flap, and then knit the 8 stitches on the other needle. Now you have 19 stitches on each needle, and you knit around and around.

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  33. This is exactly the slipper i have been wanting! So excited to make these. Thanks for sharing your pattern.

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  34. This pattern is fantastic! I've never made anything requiring a turned heel or gusset, so I was nervous about the pattern. These were really simple and I LOVE them. I'm going to make a pair for my mom, but dye the yarn in kool-aid first for some crazy colors. Thanks for this pattern!

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  35. I love this pattern and cannot wait to start knitting it- possibly using two or three strands of many of my left over balls of rowan yarn. Otherwise I do have some thicker aran and chunky. Can you confirm whether the needle size 11 is US - ie equivalent of metric size 8mm which is really big, or is it Uk 11 which is metric size 3mm!

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  36. sorry about that - I have checked on ravelry and yes I obviously need to get some 8mm double pointed needles....I'm impatient and can't get to shops due to snow!!!!

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  37. I have everything ready to start these but have a rather silly question... how are stitches arranged on the DPs? I normally knit socks on two circulars and have used three DPs. Are all heel stitches on one, and the rest divided on the other two? I would appreciate it if anyone can clarify this for me. Thanks!

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    1. When you start, you have the stitches divided up equally. Then when you do the heel, the heel stitches are on one needle and the instep stitches on one needle. When you pick up for the gusset, you have the heel and gusset stitches divided on two needles, and the instep stitches are still on one. (Hope that makes sense, but I think you will see it as you get to work.)

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    2. Thank you, Nita. I am almost done with the first one and you are right - makes sense as I am going along. Kathy

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  38. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  39. Thank you for designing and sharing you pattern. I finished the slippers over the weekend and they are finally dry enough to wear. They are perfect and were much easier to knit than I was expecting.

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  40. I have made 3 pairs of these using Knitpicks Wool of the Andes worsted, and given them all away! got creative with stripes and colors. Now, a pair for myself? lol

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    1. Sweet. Thanks for the comment.

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    2. Could you please let me know if you used this yarn singly or doubled?Have many balls,in different colrs.Just found this pattern-so excited to get started! Thanks in advance.AND thanks,Nita,for the pattern!! Have never done any felting either!!

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  41. Success! I found some skeins of Peruvian wool in Aquamarine for $1.99 each. Just felted myself a pair of slippers. They're drying now and I can't wait to needle felt a design on them.

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    1. What a treat! Congratulations, and thanks for posting.

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  42. Nita, I love your pattern for the slippers! I have made other clog-type slippers in the past but hate sewing all the pieces together so these knitted all in one piece were priceless!

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  43. Nita, your slippers look great and I would love to try them. I'm not as advanced a knitter as the others. Is there any chance of you posting a picture of your next pair of the slippers before you felted them? That may help us newbies understand the pattern better. Anyway thanks for sharing.

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    1. It may be a while before I knit another pair. There is a picture of the completed slipper before felting on my facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=315865755110352&set=pb.197230353640560.-2207520000.1360437948&type=3&theater

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    2. I am a brand new knitter, and a little nervous to take on a wearable project. These look like really comfy slippers, though. I will see what I can do with my limited skills.

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  44. When picking up the 10 stitches for the gusset, do you knit those?

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    1. With right side facing, using only your right needle, insert it as if to knit and pick up a stitch.

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  45. was the pattern at the top of this page for clogs?

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  46. This pattern is fantastic! Thank you for designing and sharing you pattern.

    Men Shoes UK

    Thanks
    Barker Marine

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  47. Thanks so much for this pattern. I made the Men's for my DH.
    After felting and drying they fit fine but I'm afraid to cut the opening so he can get it on. Please assure me that this works. If you can't tell,this is my first felt project.
    Betty

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  48. I love this pattern! so excited to make a pair! and a note to those who do not have washing machines, felting is really easy (yet time consuming) to do in your sink. When I do it I just fill a bowl (in the sink) with hot water. Then I agitate the fabric with a wooden spoon. It gets a little loose at first but after about 20 minutes or so, it comes together quite nicely. I have done this several times and have never had it fail me yet :D

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    1. Thank you, Vicious! Sounds like you are vicious with your wool; generous in your comments.

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  49. My second pair are felting now. Great pattern.
    Thanks Laurie

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  50. Love your slippers but I'm having trouble maybe you can help me. co 42 work on 24 that leave 18 on my needles pattern says I should have 14 what am I not doing. Hope that enough info. thanks for any suggestions gotta have a pair - so cute. thanks

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    1. You work the heel on the 24 stitches. There are 18 stitches which you leave on an extra needle or a holder while you work the heel. When you are done working the heel, you will have 14 stitches left of the 24. You will put these 14 stitches on two needles and begin working in the round, using the 14 stitches plus the stitches you pick up along the edge of the heel, plus the 18 you had saved. Since you pick up 10 stitches on each side of the heel, you will have a total of 52 stitches when you start your gusset. (14+20+18=52).

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  51. I was trying to make it harder. Thanks perfect sense.

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  52. I love the look of these slippers and just started knitting them and I have a question. I'm at "turn heel" and have 24 stitches. If I slip 1, K13, K2tog, K1 that adds up to 17 stitches with 7 left unknitted at the turn. What am I missing? Thanks, Ady

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    1. Never mind - I found the explanation on Ravelry!

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    2. What was the explanation? Could you post the link? I'm stuck with the same question!

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    3. Look through my posts on this site and see if one of them will help you.

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    4. You were right Nita, I just had to trust the pattern and plough ahead. They're working out great!
      Thank you so much, especially for all your ongoing support!

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  53. Ok, I may be left- handed but am having a heck of time following this pattern. Once I start kn knitting in the round after doing the gusset, I end up with a gaping hole in the front. Can someone tell me what I'm doing wrong?

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    1. Did you knit the stitches on the front needle? After you pick up stitches for the gusset, you knit the 18 stitches that were placed on one needle while you knit the heel. Then you pick up stitches for the other side of the gusset.

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  54. Maybe I am an idiot but I don't understand what to do after the heel flap. The pattern says to do the heel flap and then move onto the turn heel. My yarn is at the heel flap so how do I then go back to the stitches I left while doing the heel flap. I am a visual person and I don't get what you are talking about. I did the 3 rows of the circular stitching. Then I made the 15 rows of the heel flap and now I am stuck. PLEASE HELP!!!! I want this to work but I am at a complete loss of where to go from here.

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    1. After the 15 rows, you turn the heel. That means you knit part way across, k2tog and turn your work. You do the same on the purls side. You end up with 14 stitches on your needle (Complete instructions are above.) Then you pick up 10 stitches along the side of the 15 rows, knit the stitches you left on a separate needle, and pick up 10 sitches along the other side of the heel flap. Then you go around, making decreases to form a gusset.

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  55. Hi, thank you for the pattern. I have a question on felting and can't seem to google the answer. Do you place both pieces in one pillow case or in separate cases?

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    1. You can put both pieces in one pillow case together. The times you wouldn't want to are when you have different colors that might run and stain each other, or when you simply have too many to fit comfortably in the pillow case and still get sufficiently agitated.

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    2. wonderful :) thank you for your quick response! I was afraid if I did put them in together, they might felt together. I was getting ready to err on the side of caution and use two cases.

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  56. I am a new knitter and I would like to try this pattern with a strand of LionBrand worsted and a worsted Noro yarn . Both wool. What do you suggest when combining wools? Thanks.

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    1. It's fun to experiment. You may possibly get a knobby effect if one of the yarns shrinks more than the other, but I have often combined different kinds of wool and wool blends -- son long as you have animal fibers. I haven't experimented with blends that have more than 10% man made fibers, and I don't think these would work well.

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  57. Hi Nita! Thank you so much for sharing your pattern! I LOVE it!! I've knit and felted one pair and I've almost completed a second pair. Both are womens small narrow using size 11 dpns and Lion Brand Fisherman wool held double. I have a front loading washer so decided to hand felt my slippers. They came out awesome except they were too long and too wide for my size 6.5 medium width feet. I tried felting them again in extremely hot water and they did shrink a little more but they're still too large. Would you suggest I try felting them again or can you suggest a modification I could make to the pattern instruction so the next pair I make will felt down to my size? Any suggestion would be greatly appreciated! Thank you and happy knitting! ~Pam

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    1. Thank you, Pam. I purposely made the slippers to need a lot of felting, so they would be dense and last longer. If you want to make the next pair to need less, you could modify the pattern -- but I don't have any suggestions for you at the moment. The best thing to do is find a friend or a laundromat with a top loading washer. Good luck.

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